Forum Posts

Justin Schaub
Feb 03, 2022
In FAQs
Starting a car that hasn't been run in a while can always be a challenge, especially if you do not know the condition. You never want to try to run a car unless you know there is proper lubrication and nothing is seized up. Lets go through some very easy steps to ensure you do not hurt anything: Disconnect the battery. Remove the spark plugs to make it easier to turn over the engine. If you would like, apply oil down each spark plug hole to ensure you have some oil. Turn the motor over by hand by using the proper size wrench on the main crank bolt (Jesus Bolt) Turn the engine over 3-4 times to make sure everything completely moves. Replace spark plugs. Reconnect the battery. If you are unsure of the gasoline, drain the gas, and refuel with new gas. If the gas has been sitting for a very long time, it can turn into varnish and you may want to drop the fuel tank completely and clean out. If you try starting the vehicle with gasoline that has been sitting for years, you have the potential of clogging fuel lines and fuel injectors. Make sure you battery is fully charged to 12v. You do not want to try starting the vehicle on a dead battery. Time to start. If you know the engine turns over and fuel is ok, you can safely try to start the vehicle and continue the troubleshooting from there. Remember only 3 things are needed to start an engine. Fuel. Spark, and Air. See where you get from here and continue to ask more questions as the troubleshooting process continues. Good luck and have fun!
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Justin Schaub
Feb 03, 2022
In FAQs
It would be nice wouldn't it? Unfortunately, you can not replace the rubber guibo without dropping the exhaust. There will not be enough room to pivot the driveshaft down. To replace the guibo you will need to follow these steps: Remove the exhaust. Remove all heat shields to get access to the driveshaft Make sure the ebrake is on or the car is in at least 3rd gear to prevent the drive shaft from moving. Loosen the nuts holding the driveshaft to the differential. Loosen the 6 bolts and nuts holding the driveshaft to the transmission. Finally remove the 2 nuts holding the center support bearing. Once this is removed, you can pivot the driveshaft down to remove the driveshaft. The rubber guibo is easily accessible at this point. When replacing the guibo, remember that it only goes on a certain way. The guibo has arrows molded into the rubber. The arrows should point toward the flange of the driveshaft and the transmission. If you flip this, the guibo will fail prematurely. Good luck and have fun, I you need more troubleshooting help, please ask more questions to help build the community!
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Justin Schaub
Feb 03, 2022
In FAQs
The E30 develops a 'Lope' in idle when transitioning from cold start to running temp then all is good. Would hate to ruin it as it is quite expensive to replace (Bosch) and I don't use junk on our BMW's...
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Justin Schaub
Feb 03, 2022
In FAQs
How much oil consumption is ok before I should worry about engine longevity? My car has the m42, and I go through a quart about every 500 miles, maybe less depending on how much time is spent at high rpm. I’m sure it would consume less if I did not cane the crap out of the car, but should I be worried? Thanks!
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Justin Schaub
Feb 03, 2022
In FAQs
My 87 325i seems to advance more like it’s logging kilometers. Am I due for a cluster rebuild? It’s one of the few things I haven’t ripped apart to check. Everything works, just seems to advance way quicker than a mile would be.
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Justin Schaub
Feb 03, 2022
In FAQs
There are lots of ”opinions” out there on outdated forum threads about how to bypass the heater core on an M20. Do you have instructions or a tutorial on how to install your M20 heater block-off plate?
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Justin Schaub
Feb 03, 2022
In FAQs
We have been getting this question a lot lately so I thought I would just make a post about it. The complete E36 silicone cooling hose kit is a great upgrade over the stock rubber hoses. Not only can they withstand more pressure, but they can stand more heat, which is great. By being able to do this, you can almost eliminate and cracking or dry rotting of your standard rubber hoses. If you are swapping a 24v E36 engine (M50, S50, M52, S52) into your E30, then this kit will also work great for you! Remember all the kits come with free hose clamps, which will save you time and money. Dont forget to replace all your other cooling components as well! Let us know if you have any quesitons, or would like us to create a custom cooling package for you. Thanks!
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Justin Schaub
Dec 06, 2021
In FAQs
Hey so I’m trying to get a set of schrick 256/264 cams for my m3 and I’ve always heard of guys running 540 3.5” mafs with the 24lb injectors. I’m trying to keep the cost down as minimal as possible because the cams are a big set back themselves. i found a lot of Ev1 refurbished ford/bosch injectors on eBay for cheap and I wanted to know if anyone has experienced with those ? And also what is the correct part number to be using for the maf ? I’ve been told that I need the bosch part number ending in 800 but when I look up that part number it comes back as 078. It seems like they had more than one part number for the same part but I’m not sure. Would an aftermarket bremi manufactured 078 3.5” for a fraction of the cost of the bosch do the job just as well ?
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Justin Schaub
Dec 06, 2021
In FAQs
The answer is no. There are no RCA hookups for subwoofers.
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Justin Schaub
Dec 06, 2021
In FAQs
Deleting power steering on a BMW E36 6 cylinder engine (M52, S52), has become a popular modification. It not only simplifies the system, but can give you a more direct feel to the road. The only downside is turning under 10mph will take a little more forearm muscle. A question we get asked often is how to route the serpentine belt after you remove the power steering pump. To perform this task you will also need a shorter length belt which we offer if you need one. Please follow the diagram below to see the new routing.
Deleting E36 power steering, how do I route the serpentine belt? content media
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Justin Schaub
Dec 06, 2021
In FAQs
Now that these BMWs are becoming 25 years old or more, the steering can tend to become sloppy. This is due to a rubber flex disc or guibo that BMW uses on their u joint. At the bottom of the steering shaft, there is a u joint that connects the steering shaft to the steering rack. There are two ways to solve sloppy steering. Purchase a brand new steering u joint coupler. This is BMW part number 32311092949 Upgrade to a E34 solid steering coupler Let's explain the second option. On the E34 model, BMW eliminated the rubber flex disc in the middle of the u joint. Because of this the u joint is solid and eliminates all steering play. This has become a very popular upgrade for E36 drivers, because you not only remove the play, but get a more direct feel to the road. If you go this route, there are a few things you will need to know. The standard E36 u joint uses a pinch bolt to clamp the coupler to the steering shaft. This pinch bolt is on the outside of the steering shaft splines. The E34 u joint also uses a pinch bolt, but it goes through the steering shaft splines just a little bit. Because of this, you will need to install the E34 u joint and then take a drill bit to drill a small groove in the splines to allow the bolt to go through. This may sound scary, but it really isn't. In this picture of the E34 steering shaft, you can see the groove cut. When you perform this on the E36, the groove does not have to be cut completely around the shaft, but only where the bolt goes through. Use the bolt hole in the u joint as a guide. Keep in mind, this will not ruin your steering shaft. If you ever wanted to go back to the E36 coupler, you can. It is completely reversible.
How to fix sloppy steering in my E36? content media
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Justin Schaub
Dec 06, 2021
In FAQs
Over time of BMW ownership, something is going to break and a check engine light is going to come on. To figure out what the issue is you will have to scan the ECU to find out the engine code. In 1996 BMW switched from OBD1 to OBD2. OBD stands for on board diagnostics. OBD1 is very primitive and does not give you as much information as OBD2. When the E46 came out, they received an OBD2 (rectangular) port below the kick panel on the driver side. Before E46s the diagnostic port is under the hood. This is a circular 20 pin port that has a cap on it. We sell an OBD2 to 20 pin adapter, but this should only be used on BMWs from 1996-1999. This allows you to adapt the 20 pin circular port to the more modern OBD2 rectangular port. With this adapter you can use the modern scan tools or the OBD2 cable we sell that comes with free software to check BMW engine codes. If you have a BMW before 1996, attaching the OBD2 to 20 pin adapter WILL NOT turn your car into an OBD2 car. This is a question we get asked often. If you want to check the engine codes on an OBD1 BMW, you will need to perform a stop test. Head over to our blog post if you would like to know how to perform this test. To just make this clear, adding our OBD2 to 20 pin adapter will not make your OBD1 car into an OBD2 car.
If I buy the OBD2 to 20 pin adapter, can I use a scanner tool? content media
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Justin Schaub
Dec 06, 2021
In FAQs
This is another common question I get asked. The answer really depends on your engine, but for the sake of this question let's talk about the M5x series of engines. In my opinion there are two places to take oil temperature for an aftermarket gauge. One is a little more expensive and one is more budget friendly. You will need to purchase a distribution block like the Deluxe Oil Pressure Adapter we sell. This block has multiple ports to add various sensors to collect oil temperature, pressure and retain the factory dummy light switch. You will need a VDO M12x1.5 threaded sensor for this application. It takes the temperature right at the oil filter and is probably the most accurate reading on the engine. If you do not want to spend the money on the oil distribution block, a cheaper option is to run a VDO M12x1.5 sensor in the oil drain plug. You will remove the stock drain plug and install the sensor in its place. The sensor will not only read the oil temperature but it will act as your new drain plug. This is not as accurate as the oil takes longer to heat up down there, and since its at the bottom of the oil system, it can collect metal shavings, debris etc, and you could get a false reading. That being said, we have had luck with using this option. Here are the links to the products if you would like to do this. Remember if you use a VDO sensor, you have to use a VDO gauge. Mix matching brands usually does not work as the resistance of the gauge and sensor is different.
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Justin Schaub
Dec 06, 2021
In FAQs
Doing the s52 swap in my e30, and im keeping it odb2. Have been seeing persins using odb1 fuel rails because it come with in built fuel regulator. Is there an alternative solution for odb2 setup?
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Justin Schaub
Dec 06, 2021
In FAQs
We have been performing 24v swaps on E30s for quite some time now and the knowledge base out there is incredible. Even so, one of the most common confusions is about the coolant sensors and which ones you need to make everything work on your E30. Let's break this down. The M5x engines came in two flavors. Some heads have 2 tapped coolant ports and some have 3. I originally thought it was an OBD1 head vs OBD2 head, but I have actually seen it both ways. Most OBD2 heads (s52) have only 2 ports. OBD1 1. Blue sensor - for DME 2. Black sensor - for gauge cluster 3. Coolant hose for throttle body heater OBD 2 1. 4 prong round sensor - DME & gauge cluster combined 2. Coolant hose for throttle body heating Either head you use, you can not use the 4 prong or black sensor for the E30 gauge cluster. The reason for this is the resistance the gauge in the cluster needs. The E36 sensor uses a difference resistance than the E30 cluster, so you will not get an accurate reading. If you are performing this swap you will need to use the original E30 brown top coolant sensor. This is a one pin connector that supplies the correct temperature to the gauge cluster. The issue with this is that the brown top sensor has a larger thread than the tapped ports in the side of the head. Some people drill and tap the aluminum head to make it work, but the safest bet is to buy one of our rethreaded brown top sensors which are plug and play and do not require you to modify your cylinder head. So let's break this down further per OBD 1 vs OBD 2. OBD1 - If you have an OBD1 engine, you will only need two sensors in the side of the cylinder head. One will be blue sensor for the DME, and the other will be the rethreaded E30 brown top sensor. If you have any other tapped ports in the side of the cylinder head you can either plug them or use them for an aftermarket coolant gauge. OBD2 - If you have an OBD2 engine you will also only need two sensors in the side of the cylinder head. One will be the 4 prong E36 sensor and the other will be the rethread E30 brown top sensor. The 4 prong sensor in the E36 has two outputs, the DME and the gauge cluster. Because we are using the brown top sensor now for the gauge cluster, two of the wires going to that sensor can be eliminated. Pins 1 and 2 on the sensor go to the gauge cluster, these are what can be eliminated. Pins 3 and 4 on the sensor go to the DME, these must be retained. Any other tapped ports in the side of the cylinder head can be either plugged or used for an aftermarket gauge. Some people in colder climates like to retain the throttle body heater hose.
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Justin Schaub
Dec 06, 2021
In FAQs
This is a common question we get asked a lot. The short and muddy answer is maybe, but most likely not. A good rule of thumb when you're building your gauge pack is to stick with one manufacturer. If you are buying VDO gauges, use VDO sensors, if you're buying AEM gauges, use AEM sensors. The reason for this has to do with resistance. VDO builds their gauges to work at a specific OHM reading as the sensor provides. If you use an AEM sensor with a VDO gauge, the resistance could be different and you are going to get a false reading. If you have any questions about your setup don't hesitate to text us or email us at info@racegerman.com
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Justin Schaub
Dec 06, 2021
In FAQs
Hey guys, what is the Standard oil pressure reading on a m50? what would be a low reading, and high reading?(stock m50) Thanks!
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Justin Schaub
Dec 06, 2021
In FAQs
The cross member from the e30 auto transmission doesnt seem to align with the 5speed zf. Which cross member is needed? Is the pedal cluster from LHD interchangeable with RHD e30s?
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Justin Schaub
Dec 06, 2021
In FAQs
I have a spare m50 long block and i want to know if the head can be swapped to my s50 if something ever happens
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Justin Schaub
Dec 06, 2021
In FAQs
I get this question a lot with our upgraded exhaust stud kits. The kit contains the same quality of studs as the original, but feature a drive head at the end for easier removal and installation. Standard studs have no drive end, which means you will have to use the double nut method to take them on and off. Since the studs are hardened steel, and the BMW heads are aluminum, overtime corrosion can occur making the studs harder to remove, or install. After removing the old studs, we highly recommend you chase the threads with a thread chaser to clean all the threads before installing the upgraded studs. Do not use any type of thread locker on the studs as it would make it almost impossible to remove later. To aid in the installation of the studs, you can use a small amount of motor oil on the threads to help it go in easier. Do not use any type of drill or impact to get the studs on. Only install them by hand. If you would like more information, please watch our install video below:
Upgraded exhaust studs are hard to go in, help. content media
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Justin Schaub
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